There’s a Rang-tan in our office…

Wednesday, August 15th, 2018
greenpeace, mother, palm, oil, pal oil, fundraising, petition, work, digital, social, oragutan, rang-tan

Meet Rang-tan, the star of Greenpeace’s ambitious new campaign to end the deforestation and destruction caused by palm oil production.

She was created in collaboration with Mother and brought to life by the talented animation studio, Salon Alpin. Her story is beautifully told and the truth behind it heart-breaking – so we couldn’t wait to roll up our sleeves and help Greenpeace spread her story far and wide.

Over the past few months, we’ve been working behind the scenes developing activations, creating ads and assets, and offering a helping hand wherever possible. And we’ve been lucky enough to watch Rang-tan go from a sketch on a page to a living, breathing, tumbling baby orangutan.

She’s made us smile, she’s made us cry and she’s opened our eyes a little wider. And now we can’t wait to watch Rang-tan do the same for thousands of other people.

Good luck Rang-tan,

Alfie


Back to the future

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018
Institute of Fundraising Awards - winning fundraising campaigns for Terrence Higgins Trust and Unicef

It’s been a funny year in fundraising. By which I mean it’s been difficult and often deeply unfunny. So, even more so than the previous event, the IOF Awards do last night started out feeling a bit like a much-needed support group meeting.

But, once the wine started flowing and Stephen K Amos found a way to make even the pre-records funny, everyone got a bit silly and our partners won some awards. Phew.

First up was some work that we all love and which has been a bit of a beacon at Open over the last couple of years – Terrence Higgins Trust’s Be Proud. Be Sexy. Be Safe. campaign.


Terrence Higgins Trusts' Be Proud. Be Sexy. Be Safe fundraising campaign tote bag
If you didn’t see our very own @fiona_pattison and @aliwalker84 presenting yesterday, this campaign uses laser-sharp targeting and Facebook Lead Ads to engage people with the cause and then seals the deal with a bit of (dare I say it) good old fashioned Direct Marketing. The end result of all this cleverness is a very, very cost-effective fundraising programme that’s brought a ton of new, engaged supporters to THT.

There was then (for team Open) a bit of a frustrating interlude where Scope’s much-lauded Mindful Monsters was pipped for three awards. Ouch.

But then, thankfully, Unicef bagged the award that, as a DM dinosaur, I’d really been hoping for – Best Use of Insight for its GDPR work.

Unicef's GDPR Consent campaign won at the Institute of Fundraising Awards and IoF Insight Awards


This project – which also won the IOF Insight Group Award – combined a bunch of data analysis, modelling and qualitative research to create a campaign that made sure a huge chunk of UNICEF’s supporters weren’t snatched away by GDPR. 

The whole thing was absolutely textbook in its conception and execution – and absolutely critical in its results. And as an agency that’s often known for its creative and/or tech, it’s nice to show that, at our heart, we’re all about the data and the audience.

So there you are. Old techniques, new channels and more ways forward.

Cheers!

James

 

 


Cider, kiwis and Millennials

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

kiwi

 

A lot of you will know that Open has a strong West Country contingent and we live up to the stereotype of being fond of a pint or two of cider…

 

But the reason this campaign by Old Mout caught my attention is because there is no mention of the product. Nothing about how good the cider tastes or that it’s good value, or that you’ll have a lot of fun drinking it.

 

Instead the sole focus is that Old Mout will make a donation to charity for every bottle bought to save the kiwi *cute*.

 

 

No doubt this campaign started life with a focus on audience – the much talked about but elusive millennial. And it’s smart because, more than any other audience, they care about the ethics and social responsibility of the companies they buy from. 73% are willing to spend more on a product if it comes from a sustainable brand (against an average of 66%). And more than 9 in 10 would switch brands to one associated with a cause. When it comes to purchase decision making the traditional drivers of price and convenience are taking a back seat.

 

Millennials matter to our sector as much as any other generation. But, given the fact that our reason for being is ‘social good’, surely attracting and engaging them should be an easier job for us than most of the corporate brands?

 

After all, there are 17 million of us and we’re all over the internet!

 

Fiona

 

Sources

Nielsen

University of California Berkeley